Year: 1961

Alter Ego #001

Category:Fanzines
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Year
Writers / Artists,
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Edited by Jerry Bails and Roy Thomas.

Several printings (1961, 1963 and 1964 at least).

Alter Ego #002

Category:Fanzines
Publisher
Country
Year
Writers / Artists,
Notes

Edited by Jerry Bails and Roy Thomas.

Alter Ego #003

Category:Fanzines
Publisher
Country
Year
Notes

Edited by Jerry Bails and Roy Thomas.

Harbinger #3

Category:Fanzines
Publisher
Country
Year
Notes

Maggie Thompson (Curtis), art editor.

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On the Drawing Board #04

Category:Fanzines
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Year
Writers / Artists
On the Drawing Board #05

Category:Fanzines
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Year
Writers / Artists
On the Drawing Board #06

Category:Fanzines
Publisher
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Year
Writers / Artists
Rocket’s Blast #001

Category:Fanzines
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Year
Writers / Artists,
Notes

2 single-sided pages on carbon paper.  Page count varies: copies that were 8.5 x 14 inches were likely 2 pages, and 8.5 x 11 copies were likely 3 pages.

 

At least three different versions exist, with same content but different lay-outs. 

 

Editorial features include:

"TO THE MEMBERS" message from GB Love.   "Dividing Line" very short story (one paragraph) by Bernie Bubnis.   "THE COLLECTOR'S CORNER" column by GB Love (recommending Flash #123 and Green Lantern #8).   "WE SUGGEST" comic suggestion column (GB suggests Amazing Adult Fantasy #9).   "THE SCIENCE SHOP" column discusses The Abominable Snowman (Part I).  “Special Announcement" by Love announces there will be classified ads in next issue. 

 

Circulation: only 7 produced (6 on carbon paper, one is manually typed), 2 pgs, single-sided printing via carbon-paper, top stapled. on legal-sized paper.

 

(According to Anthony F Smith who handled the estate of GB Love: “The situation on Rocket's Blast #1 & #2 … the copies out of GB Love's collection … suggest how many copies were done.  There were 6 carbon copies of the first issue PLUS GB's typed cover copy, for a total of SEVEN.   Inside he listed by names all the subscribers: Rick Weingroff, Rusty Clapsaddle, Buddy Saunders, Charles Donthitt, Jerry Snipes, Bernie Bubnis, Jr.”)

 

 

Skybird #1

Category:Fanzines
Publisher
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Year
Writers / Artists
Xero #03

Category:Fanzines
Country
Year
Notes

Xero was a key building block in the creation of comics fandom. Produced by Dick and Pat Lupoff with Bhob Stewart (uncredited), it was a widely circulated science fiction fanzine that began to examine comic books thru the pivotal series “All In Color For A Dime.”  Those articles help focus the attention of would be comic fans in comic books, and the entire series was later reprinted in book form. Xero went on to win a Hugo, and some of the articles were reprinted many years later in a hardback book. In Flyer #5, the supplement to Xero, Dick Lupoff mentioned that the circulation of the zine was 160 copies. No copies were for sale, and no subscriptions were ever accepted. It was only available by direct mailing with recipients getting one free first time copy, and you only got subsequent issues by trading your zine for it, or writing letters of comment (long letters, not just post cards and thank you notes), or writing articles for the publication. [Aaron Caplan]

There may be more contributors than listed above.

Xero #07

Category:Fanzines
Country
Year
Notes

Xero was a key building block in the creation of comics fandom. Produced by Dick and Pat Lupoff with Bhob Stewart (uncredited), it was a widely circulated science fiction fanzine that began to examine comic books thru the pivotal series “All In Color For A Dime.”  Those articles help focus the attention of would be comic fans in comic books, and the entire series was later reprinted in book form. Xero went on to win a Hugo, and some of the articles were reprinted many years later in a hardback book. In Flyer #5, the supplement to Xero, Dick Lupoff mentioned that the circulation of the zine was 160 copies. No copies were for sale, and no subscriptions were ever accepted. It was only available by direct mailing with recipients getting one free first time copy, and you only got subsequent issues by trading your zine for it, or writing letters of comment (long letters, not just post cards and thank you notes), or writing articles for the publication. [Aaron Caplan]